"You won't get any more overtime now you've made that complaint. We don't like troublemakers here”

VICTIMISATION

After Naomi makes a formal complaint of sexual harassment against another intern her supervisor tells her, “You won't get any more overtime now you've made that complaint. We don't like troublemakers here”.

Naomi’s supervisor is threatening to punish her because she made a complaint about sexual harassment at work. That’s victimisation. That’s against the law.

You have the right to make a complaint about inappropriate behaviour – like the examples given on this website – and not to be victimised for doing so. That includes being bullied because you stood up for your equal opportunity rights.

What does the law say about victimisation?

Victimisation is subjecting someone, or threatening to subject someone, to a detriment – that means disadvantaging them in some way – because they spoke up about their equal opportunity rights at work, made a complaint, or helped someone else make a complaint. 

Victimisation is against the law. It includes your boss, manager, coworkers and anyone else in your workplace.

All complaints about discrimination and sexual harassment or racial and religious vilification should be taken seriously by your boss. 

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